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dc.creatorCurtis, L.en_US
dc.creatorAgyakwah, S.K.en_US
dc.creatorAttipoe, F.Y.en_US
dc.creatorNugent, C.en_US
dc.creatorCrooijmans, R.P.en_US
dc.creatorToguyeni, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-20T08:17:35Z
dc.date.available2019-11-20T08:17:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationLind, C. E. et al. (2019). Genetic diversity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) throughout West Africa. Scientific Reports, 9: 16767.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/3817
dc.description.abstractNile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) is a globally significant aquaculture species rapidly gaining status as a farmed commodity. In West Africa, wild Nile tilapia genetic resources are abundant yet knowledge of fine-scale population structure and patterns of natural genetic variation are limited. Coinciding with this is a burgeoning growth in tilapia aquaculture in Ghana and other countries within the region underpinned by locally available genetic resources. Using 192 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers this study conducted a genetic survey of Nile tilapia throughout West Africa, sampling 23 wild populations across eight countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, Mali, Gambia and Senegal), representing the major catchments of the Volta, Niger, Senegal and Gambia River basins. A pattern of isolation-by-distance and significant spatial genetic structure was identified throughout West Africa (Global FST = 0.144), which largely corresponds to major river basins and, to a lesser extent, sub-basins. Two populations from the Gambia River (Kudang and Walekounda), one from the western Niger River (Lake Sélingué) and one from the upper Red Volta River (Kongoussi) showed markedly lower levels of diversity and high genetic differentiation compared to all other populations, suggesting genetically isolated populations occurring across the region. Genetic structure within the Volta Basin did not always follow the pattern expected for sub-river basins. This study identifies clear genetic structuring and differentiation amongst West African Nile tilapia populations, which concur with broad patterns found in previous studies. In addition, we provide new evidence for fine-scale genetic structuring within the Volta Basin and previously unidentified genetic differences of populations in Gambia. The 192 SNP marker suite used in this study is a useful tool for differentiating tilapia populations and we recommend incorporating this marker suite into future population screening of O. niloticus. Our results form the basis of a solid platform for future research on wild tilapia genetic resources in West Africa, and the identification of potentially valuable germplasm for use in ongoing breeding programs for aquaculture.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature) (Fully open access journals)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.subjectgenetic variationsen_US
dc.subjectlife below wateren_US
dc.subjectFishen_US
dc.titleGenetic diversity of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) throughout West Africaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderCRP on Fish Agri-Food Systemsen_US
cg.contributor.projectWorldFish and Fish knowledge and data productsen_US
cg.coverage.countryBeninen_US
cg.coverage.countryBurkina Fasoen_US
cg.coverage.countryCôte D`Ivoireen_US
cg.coverage.countryGambiaen_US
cg.coverage.countryGhanaen_US
cg.coverage.countryMalien_US
cg.coverage.countrySenegalen_US
cg.coverage.countryTogoen_US
cg.coverage.regionWest Africaen_US
cg.identifier.worldfish4479
cg.subject.agrovocaquacultureen_US
cg.subject.agrovocbiologyen_US
cg.subject.agrovocgeneticsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocanimal breedingen_US
cg.subject.agrovoctilapiaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocoreochromis niloticusen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfreshwater ecologyen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCSIR Water Research Instituteen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationFood and Agriculture Organization of the United Nationsen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWageningen University & Research Centreen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCentre International de Recherche-Développement sur l’Elevage en zone Subhumideen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorCurtis, L.en_US
cg.description.themeSustainable aquacultureen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-53295-yen_US


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