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dc.creatorWelcomme, R.L.
dc.creatorCowx, I.G.
dc.creatorCoates, D.
dc.creatorBéné, C.
dc.creatorFunge-Smith, S.
dc.creatorHalls, A.
dc.creatorLorenzen, K.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-12T08:54:27Z
dc.date.available2018-10-12T08:54:27Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifierWF_2643.pdf
dc.identifier.citationPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 365 (1554): 2881-2896
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/1275
dc.description.abstractThe reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherRoyal Society
dc.sourcePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
dc.titleInland capture fisheries
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWelcomme, R.L. et al. (2010). Inland capture fisheries. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 365 (1554): 2881-2896
dc.description.versionPeer Review
cg.coverage.regionAfrica
cg.coverage.regionAsia
cg.identifier.worldfish2643
cg.subject.agrovocclimate change
cg.subject.agrovocfisheries
cg.subject.agrovocfreshwater
cg.subject.agrovocwatersheds
cg.subject.agrovocwetlands
cg.subject.worldfishfisheries management
cg.subject.worldfishfresh water
cg.subject.worldfishriver basins
cg.contributor.affiliationImperial College London
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Hull
cg.contributor.affiliationSecretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFish
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexed
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorBéné, C.
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheries


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