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dc.creatorThe WorldFish Center
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-12T09:11:48Z
dc.date.available2018-10-12T09:11:48Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifierWF_2729.pdf
dc.identifier.citationBrief no. 2134. The WorldFish Center. Penang, Malaysia. 8 p.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/1292
dc.description.abstractAquaculture is the fastest growing food production sector in the world today, supplying half of global fish consumption. Production from capture fisheries has stagnated and is unable to meet the anticipated growth in demand. Current indications are that Asian and African aquaculture will need to grow substantially to meet future demand for fish and must do so largely by increasing production per unit of land and water used. In response, WorldFish and partners are placing increasing emphasis on developing technologies that can support national and regional efforts to meet this need. This brief highlights the research and development of GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) programs undertaken at the WorldFish Center.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.titleGenetic improvement of farmed aquatic animals at the WorldFish Center
dc.typeBrief
dcterms.bibliographicCitationThe WorldFish Center (2010). Genetic improvement of farmed aquatic animals at the WorldFish Center. Brief no. 2134. The WorldFish Center. Penang, Malaysia. 8 p.
cg.identifier.worldfish2729
cg.subject.agrovocaquaculture
cg.subject.agrovocgenetics
cg.subject.worldfishGIFT
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture


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