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dc.creatorRatner, B.D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-27T10:36:25Z
dc.date.available2018-11-27T10:36:25Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier661.pdf
dc.identifier.citationIn: Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, Island Press, Washington, D.C. pp. 213-255. [open access]
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/1918
dc.description.abstractFresh water can make a greater contribution to human well-being if society improves the design and management of water resource infrastructure, establishes more inclusive governance and integrated approaches to water management, and adopts water conservation technologies, demand management, and market-based approaches to reallocation that increase water productivity. Rising human population and levels of socioeconomic development have led to a rapid rate of water resource development and the replacement of naturally occurring and functioning systems with highly modified and human-engineered systems. Meeting human needs for freshwater provisioning services of irrigation, domestic water, power, and transport has come at the expense of inland water ecosystems—rivers, lakes, and wetlands—that contribute to human well-being through recreation, scenic values, maintenance of fisheries and biodiversity, and ecosystem function.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherIsland Press
dc.titleMillenium Ecosystem Assessment. 2005. Global Assessment Report: Policy Responses.
dc.typeBook Chapter
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRatner, B.D. (2005). Millenium Ecosystem Assessment. 2005. Global Assessment Report: Policy Responses.. In: Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, Island Press, Washington, D.C. pp. 213-255.
cg.coverage.regionGlobal
cg.identifier.worldfish661
cg.subject.agrovocecosystems
cg.subject.worldfishpolicy
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeMiscellaneous


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