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dc.creatorRatner, B.D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-06T10:26:31Z
dc.date.available2018-12-06T10:26:31Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifierWF_1903.pdf
dc.identifier.citationHuman Rights Dialogue, 2(11): 6-7 [open access]
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/1996
dc.description.abstractWhen Ning Savat laid down his arms at the end of Cambodia’s civil war, he returned to what he hoped would be a simple, peaceful life as a fisherman. What he did not know was that he was stepping into one of the country’s most prominent popular struggles of the post-war period. Shocked by the violence, intimidation, and corruption that threatened the livelihoods of his fellow fisherfolk throughout the country, he became a human rights advocate. Working on behalf of the poor to secure access to fishing grounds, to protect them from the abuses of fishing lot owners and their armed guards, and to have their grievances heard before local authorities and the courts has now become his daily battle.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.sourceHuman Rights Dialogue
dc.titleEnvironmental rights as a matter of survival
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationRatner, B.D. (2004). Environmental rights as a matter of survival. Human Rights Dialogue, 2(11): 6-7
cg.coverage.countryCambodia
cg.coverage.regionSouth East Asia
cg.identifier.worldfish1903
cg.subject.agrovocgovernance
cg.subject.agrovochuman rights
cg.subject.worldfishequity
cg.subject.worldfishfisheries management
cg.subject.worldfishvulnerability
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFish
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorRatner, B.D.
cg.description.themeMiscellaneous


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