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dc.creatorAiken, K.A.
dc.creatorMorris, D.
dc.creatorHanley, F.C.
dc.creatorManning, R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-10T11:13:18Z
dc.date.available2019-01-10T11:13:18Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifierNAGA_25no3n4_features_b.pdf
dc.identifier.citationNaga 25(3/4): 10-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/2290
dc.description.abstractJamaica, with its overfish marine resources, has become a major tilapia producer in Latin America led by a small number of large farms practicing tilapia culture with considerable commercial success. Across the country, however, aquaculture is typically practiced by a large number of small-scale fish farmers who own less than 1.0 ha of land. Production is constrained by lack of credit, finite land space and suitable soil type, but larger existing aquaculturists are expanding further for overseas markets. Inspired by pioneering tilapia fish culture demonstration projects funded by the USAID and the goverment of Jamaica, fish culture production rose from a few hundred kg of Oreochromis niloticus in 1977, to about 5000 t of processed fish mainly red hybrid tilapia, in 2000. Most of this quantity was exported to Europe and North America.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherWorldFish
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceNAGA
dc.titleAquaculture in Jamaica
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationAiken, K.A. et al. (2002). Aquaculture in Jamaica. Naga 25(3/4): 10-15
cg.coverage.countryJamaica
cg.coverage.regionLatin America
cg.identifier.worldfish1701
cg.subject.agrovocaquaculture
cg.subject.agrovocdevelopment
cg.subject.agrovocfarmers
cg.subject.agrovocfish culture
cg.subject.agrovocprawns and shrimps
cg.subject.agrovoctilapia
cg.subject.worldfishfish farming
cg.subject.worldfishprawns
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of West Indies
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture


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