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dc.creatorMcCauley, D.J.
dc.creatorJablonicky, C.
dc.creatorAllison, E.H.
dc.creatorGolden, C.D.
dc.creatorJoyce, F.H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-20T10:49:05Z
dc.date.available2019-01-20T10:49:05Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier4336.pdf
dc.identifier.citationScience Advances, 4(8): eaau2161
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/2339
dc.description.abstractThe patterns by which different nations share global fisheries influence outcomes for food security, trajectories of economic development, and competition between industrial and small-scale fishing. We report patterns of industrial fishing effort for vessels flagged to higher- and lower-income nations, in marine areas within and beyond national jurisdiction, using analyses of high-resolution fishing vessel activity data. These analyses reveal global dominance of industrial fishing by wealthy nations. Vessels flagged to higher-income nations, for example, are responsible for 97% of the trackable industrial fishing on the high seas and 78% of such effort within the national waters of lower-income countries. These publicly accessible vessel tracking data have important limitations. However, insights from these new analyses can begin to strategically inform important international- and national-level efforts underway now to ensure equitable and sustainable sharing of fisheries.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Advancement Science
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceScience Advances
dc.titleWealthy countries dominate industrial fishing
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationMcCauley, D.J. et al. (2018). Wealthy countries dominate industrial fishing. Science Advances, 4(8): eaau2161
dc.description.versionPeer Review
cg.contributor.crpFISH
cg.contributor.funderBenioff Ocean Initiative
cg.contributor.funderAlfred P. Sloan Foundation
cg.contributor.funderSESYNC (National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center) National Science Foundation
cg.contributor.funderWellcome Trust Our Planet, Our Health
cg.contributor.funderNational Geographic Society’s Pristine Seas project and E. Sala
cg.coverage.regionGlobal
cg.identifier.worldfish4336
cg.subject.agrovocFisheries
cg.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationBenioff Ocean Initiative, University of California, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationMarine Science Institute, University of California, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationSchool of Marine and Environmental Affairs, University of Washington, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFish
cg.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationGlobal Fishing Watch, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationBren School of Environmental Management and Marine Science Institute, University of California, USA
cg.contributor.affiliationPristine Seas, National Geographic Society, USA
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexed
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorAllison, E.H.
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheries
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.aau2161


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