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dc.creatorPaclibare, J.O.
dc.creatorVerdegem, M.C.J.
dc.creatorvan Muiswinkel, W.B.
dc.creatorHuisman, B.E.A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-31T06:56:17Z
dc.date.available2019-01-31T06:56:17Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifierna_2289.pdf
dc.identifier.citationNAGA 21 (4): 22-24
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/2543
dc.description.abstractThe use of antibiotics and other chemicals in controlling shrimp pathogens become ineffective as the strains grow more resistant to these chemicals. Moreover, the bacterial pathogen (Vibrio harveyi) produced biofilm coating that protects it from dying and disinfection procedures that are followed during pond preparation. Biological control is being considered as an alternative means of preventing shrimp disease outbreak. The main principle behind biological control is to enhance the growth of beneficial microorganisms which serve as antagonists or target pathogens. The paper discusses shrimp and tilapia crop rotation as a form of effective biological control, a technique which is already being practiced in Indonesia and the Philippines.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherICLARM
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceNAGA
dc.titleThe potential for crop rotation in controlling diseases in shrimp culture
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPaclibare, J.O. et al. (1998). The potential for crop rotation in controlling diseases in shrimp culture. NAGA 21 (4): 22-24
cg.coverage.countryIndonesia
cg.coverage.countryPhilippines
cg.coverage.regionAsia
cg.identifier.worldfish2289
cg.subject.agrovocagriculture
cg.subject.agrovocCrustacea
cg.subject.agrovocdiseases
cg.subject.agrovocprawns and shrimps
cg.subject.worldfishCrustaceans
cg.subject.worldfishshrimp
cg.contributor.affiliationBureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Philippines
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture


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