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dc.creatorBrummett, R.E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-25T02:54:47Z
dc.date.available2019-02-25T02:54:47Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifierna_1445.pdf
dc.identifier.citationNAGA 18 (1): 12-14
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/2794
dc.description.abstractDespite the expenditure of huge amounts of money and human effort, the Green Revolution has largely failed to benefit the vast majority of the rural poor in Africa: those smallholding farmers who sell little, if any, of what they grow and rely almost entirely upon natural soil fertility, rainfall and traditional broodstock and seed varieties. New approaches on food production and income generation in the rural areas must be found if this sector of agricultural community is to be assisted. Integrated resources management (IRM) in general, and integrated agriculture-aquaculture (IAA) in particular, may offer some solutions in cases where the classical methods of improving farm output have failed and/or been unsustainable.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherICLARM
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceNAGA
dc.titleIntegrated resources management, integrated agriculture-aquaculture and the African farmer
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrummett, R.E. (1995). Integrated resources management, integrated agriculture-aquaculture and the African farmer. NAGA 18 (1): 12-14
cg.coverage.regionAfrica
cg.identifier.worldfish1445
cg.subject.agrovocagriculture
cg.subject.agrovocaquaculture
cg.subject.agrovocfarmers
cg.subject.worldfishnatural resource management
cg.contributor.affiliationICLARM/GTZ Africa Aquaculture Project, Malawi
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture


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