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dc.creatorLightfoot, C.
dc.creatorGupta, M.V.
dc.creatorAhmed, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-24T05:52:30Z
dc.date.available2019-03-24T05:52:30Z
dc.date.issued1992
dc.identifierna_1386.pdf
dc.identifier.citationNAGA 15 (3): 9-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/3020
dc.description.abstractLike most developing countries, Bangladesh wants to improve the income and nutrition of its rural population most of whom live under uncertain and harsh social and environmental conditions. These rural households farm with little access to land, water or capital. Farming itself is fraught with the uncertainties of rain and floods. There are, however, many seasonal water resources in the country in which fish will grow. There is a challenge to bring aquaculture as a complement to other agricultural activities. The potential rewards in income and food are high (see Naga July 1990, p. 8). What approach should be taken in order to stimulate households into culturing fish? This article examined an alternative approach vs the conventional high input approaches of fish culture.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherICLARM
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceNAGA
dc.titleLow external input sustainable aquaculture for Bangladesh: an operational framework
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationLightfoot, C.; Gupta, M.V.; Ahmed, M. (1992). Low external input sustainable aquaculture for Bangladesh: an operational framework. NAGA 15 (3): 9-12
cg.coverage.countryBangladesh
cg.coverage.regionSouth Asia
cg.identifier.worldfish1386
cg.subject.agrovocaquaculture
cg.contributor.affiliationICLARM
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture


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