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dc.creatorPauly, D.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-22T04:54:46Z
dc.date.available2019-04-22T04:54:46Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.citationp. 1-9. In: Chua, T.E. ; Pauly, D. (eds.) Coastal area management in Southeast Asia: policies, management strategies and case studies. ICLARM conference proceedings 19, 254 p. Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment, Kuala Lumpur; Johor State Economic Planning Unit, Johore Bahru, Malaysia; and International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management, Manila, Philippines.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/3269
dc.description.abstractBecause, in general, the economies of Southeast Asian countries are "developing", policy-makers generally assume that the fisheries sector also needs to be "developed" through soft loans, tax rebates, construction of ports, etc. This contribution shows that such classical fisheries development methods are no longer appropriate for fisheries in the ASEAN countries, where overfishing is the rule rather than the exception. A rationale and some strategies for rolling back excessive fishing effort in over-fished areas are briefly presented.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.sourcep. 1-9. In: Chua, T.E. ; Pauly, D. (eds.) Coastal area management in Southeast Asia: policies, management strategies and case studies. ICLARM conference proceedings 19, 254 p. Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment, Kuala Lumpur; Johor State Economic Planning Unit, Johore Bahru, Malaysia; and International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management, Manila, Philippines.
dc.titleFisheries resources management in Southeast Asia: why bothers?
dc.typeBook Chapter
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPauly, D. (1989). Fisheries resources management in Southeast Asia: why bothers?. p. 1-9. In: Chua, T.E. ; Pauly, D. (eds.) Coastal area management in Southeast Asia: policies, management strategies and case studies. ICLARM conference proceedings 19, 254 p. Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment, Kuala Lumpur; Johor State Economic Planning Unit, Johore Bahru, Malaysia; and International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management, Manila, Philippines.
cg.coverage.regionAsia
cg.identifier.worldfish2378
cg.subject.agrovocfisheries
cg.subject.worldfishfisheries management
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheries


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