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dc.creatorWelcomme, R.L.
dc.creatorKapetsky, J.K.
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-28T10:03:03Z
dc.date.available2019-06-28T10:03:03Z
dc.date.issued1981
dc.identifierin_3435.pdf
dc.identifier.citationICLARM Newsletter 4 (4): 3-4
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/3684
dc.description.abstractFishing installations consisting of branches of trees, bushes or other soft vegetation stuck into the muddy bottoms of lagoons, lakes or rivers, are common throughout the world. Collectively, these may be termed "brush parks" and are found in many parts of west Africa, Madagascar, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Cambodia and China, as well as in Ecuador and Mexico. Two main types are common: (a) small, circular piles of branches sometimes surrounded by fences of more durable wood, and (b) larger, rectangular installations. Brush parks have usually been considered simply as devices for the attraction and concentration of fish, shrimps and crabs from the surrounding waters. However, one study in Benin has shown that the situation is in reality more complicated.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherICLARM
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceICLARM Newsletter
dc.titleAcadjas: the brush park fisheries of Benin, West Africa
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWelcomme, R.L.; Kapetsky, J.K. (1981). Acadjas: the brush park fisheries of Benin, West Africa. ICLARM Newsletter 4 (4): 3-4
cg.coverage.countryBenin
cg.coverage.countryMadagascar
cg.coverage.regionAfrica
cg.coverage.regionWest Africa
cg.identifier.worldfish3435
cg.subject.agrovocfisheries
cg.contributor.affiliationFAO
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheries


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