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dc.creatorKakwasha, K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-20T10:48:13Z
dc.date.available2020-01-20T10:48:13Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationCavendish University Zambia. Master Thesis.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/3863
dc.description.abstractThe general objective of this study was to analyze the informal trade as source of household income with a special focus on cross border fish traders in Zambia. The study covers findings from border site fish markets in Nakonde, Kasumbalesa, Luangwa and Katimamulilo border posts. These locations represent massive movements of fish products across borders. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. The author learnt that informal fish trade plays an important role in the income of people in various communities in Zambia, with at least 108,000 people engaged as full time informal cross border fish traders and 171,177,420 USD worthy of fish sold through informal routes. In terms of tonnage, the fish entering Zambia has been increasing from 77,199 tons in 2015 to 126,345 tons in 2016. However, the study established that only 23.13 percent of imported fish is sold within Zambia. The rest of the imported fish (97,119.06 tons) ends up in the DRC by informal trading through Kasumbalesa border post. The bulk of this was frozen horse mackerel traded through Katimamulilo border post to Kasumbalesa border to DRC. In other border posts, small sized and dried fish species dominated the markets. Despite of this, cross border fish traders face a lot of challenges to penetrate the lucrative markets in the neighboring countries. The formal sector is less attractive and this encourages traders to continue trading informally. The study recommends that organizations working with fish traders including the ministry responsible for fisheries should encourage efficient movement of fisheries commodities across the borders. Zambia has greater opportunities for trade in fisheries products in the region provided impediments to intra-regional trade are minimized. Successful trade provides crucial source of foreign exchange to help a nation‟s balance of payments, and also leads to increased employment as trade is directly linked to production. Furthermore, the multiplier effect in other businesses would further foster economic growth and improved livelihood for fishery-dependent communities.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherCavendish University Zambiaen_US
dc.rightsAdobe-2006en_US
dc.subjectcrossborderen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of the Informal Trade as a Source of Household Income: A Case of Cross-border Fish Traders in Zambiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationKakwasha, K. (2017). Analysis of the Informal Trade as a Source of Household Income: A Case of Cross-border Fish Traders in Zambia. Cavendish University Zambia. Master Thesis.
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Officeen_US
cg.coverage.countryMalawien_US
cg.coverage.countryMozambiqueen_US
cg.coverage.countryZambiaen_US
cg.coverage.regionEast Africaen_US
cg.identifier.worldfish4535
cg.subject.agrovoctradeen_US
cg.subject.agrovochousehold incomeen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorKakwasha, K.en_US
cg.description.themeMiscellaneous themesen_US
cg.creator.idKeagan Kakwasha: 0000-0003-4251-7449en_US


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