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dc.creatorCinner, J.E.en_US
dc.creatorLau, J.D.en_US
dc.creatorBauman, A.G.en_US
dc.creatorFeary, D.A.en_US
dc.creatorJanuchowski-Hartley, F.A.en_US
dc.creatorRojas, C.A.en_US
dc.creatorBarnes, M.L.en_US
dc.creatorBergseth, B.J.en_US
dc.creatorShum, E.en_US
dc.creatorLahari, R.en_US
dc.creatorBen, J.en_US
dc.creatorGraham, N.A.J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T08:55:05Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T08:55:05Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 116(52): 26474-26483.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/3885
dc.description.abstractEfforts to confront the challenges of environmental change and uncertainty include attempts to adaptively manage social–ecological systems. However, critical questions remain about whether adaptive management can lead to sustainable outcomes for both ecosystems and society. Here, we make a contribution to these efforts by presenting a 16-y analysis of ecological outcomes and perceived livelihood impacts from adaptive coral reef management in Papua New Guinea. The adaptive management system we studied was a customary rotational fisheries closure system (akin to fallow agriculture), which helped to increase the biomass of reef fish and make fish less wary (more catchable) relative to openly fished areas. However, over time the amount of fish in openly fished reefs slowly declined. We found that, overall, resource users tended to have positive perceptions about this system, but there were negative perceptions when fishing was being prohibited. We also highlight some of the key traits of this adaptive management system, including 1) strong social cohesion, whereby leaders played a critical role in knowledge exchange; 2) high levels of compliance, which was facilitated via a “carrot-and-stick” approach that publicly rewarded good behavior and punished deviant behavior; and 3) high levels of participation by community actors.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.subjectsocial-ecological systemsen_US
dc.subjectadaptive managementen_US
dc.subjectcoral reefen_US
dc.subjectcustomary managementen_US
dc.titleSixteen years of social and ecological dynamics reveal challenges and opportunities for adaptive management in sustaining the commonsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationCinner J. et al. (2019). Sixteen years of social and ecological dynamics reveal challenges and opportunities for adaptive management in sustaining the commons. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), 116(52): 26474-26483.
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR Fund Officeen_US
cg.coverage.countryPapua New Guineaen_US
cg.coverage.regionMelanesiaen_US
cg.identifier.worldfish4520
cg.subject.agrovocfisheriesen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsmall-scale fisheriesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationLancaster Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies - James Cook Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, College of Science and Engineeringen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationNational University of Singaporeen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationMRAG Ltden_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheriesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1914812116en_US


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