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dc.creatorEriksson, H.en_US
dc.creatorRide, A.en_US
dc.creatorNotere Boso, D.en_US
dc.creatorSukulu, M.en_US
dc.creatorBatalofo, M.en_US
dc.creatorSiota, F.en_US
dc.creatorGomese, C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-15T08:26:21Z
dc.date.available2020-06-15T08:26:21Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationPenang, Malaysia: WorldFish. Program Report: 2020-22.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4195
dc.description.abstractAlthough as of June 1, 2020, Solomon Islands had no coronavirus cases, there was a national economic recession plus restrictions on people’s movement, gatherings, education and business activities. For rural areas, two of the biggest changes have been increased circulation of people—those who moved out of Honiara and back to the provinces—and reduced cash flow. Food trade is impacted by a lack of cash in circulation, meaning reduced marketing of foods in villages and a rise in bartering of fish for other foods. In a small portion of communities (15%), conflicts prior to the current situation had meant management rules were being broken. In most communities, community-based resource management (CBRM) committees had responded by raising awareness about fisheries rules. In a few cases, communities had increased enforcement or organized activities, such as group harvests. This survey suggests significant capacity for people in provinces to adapt to the situation and feed both usual residents and circular residents. However, because of reduced cash flow and the ongoing situation, there is also growing strain on food systems. This strain is likely to be experienced differently by men and women. The study suggests further research on this, particularly in relation to increased burdens and reduced income. We highlight six ongoing initiatives that can be springboards for further action by government, non government and international actors regarding fisheries to increase resilience and improve the ability of rural communities to respond to the current situation.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWorldFish
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.subjectno povertyen_US
dc.subjectzero hungeren_US
dc.subjectlife below wateren_US
dc.subjectFishen_US
dc.titleChanges and adaptations in village food systems in Solomon Islands: A rapid appraisal during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemicen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationEriksson, H. ; Ride, A. ;Boso, D. ; Sukulu, M. ; Batalofo, M. ; Siota, F. ; Gomese, C. (2020). Changes and adaptations in village food systems in Solomon Islands: A rapid appraisal during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Penang, Malaysia: WorldFish. Program Report: 2020-22
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderAustralian Center for International Agricultural Researchen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Officeen_US
cg.contributor.funderStockholm Resilience Centreen_US
cg.coverage.countrySolomon Islandsen_US
cg.coverage.regionMelanesiaen_US
cg.identifier.worldfish4712
cg.subject.agrovocadaptationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfisheriesen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfood securityen_US
cg.subject.agrovocnutritionen_US
cg.subject.agrovocresearchen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfood systemsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationIndependent / Not associateden_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorEriksson, H.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorNotere Boso, D.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorSukulu, M.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorBatalofo, M.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorSiota, F.en_US
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheriesen_US
cg.creator.idHampus Eriksson: 0000-0003-1199-6889en_US


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