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dc.creatorSong, A.en_US
dc.creatorScholtens, J.en_US
dc.creatorBarclay, K.en_US
dc.creatorBush, S.R.en_US
dc.creatorFabinyi, M.en_US
dc.creatorAdhuri, D.S.en_US
dc.creatorHaughton, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-29T07:43:24Z
dc.date.available2020-06-29T07:43:24Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationFish and Fisheries, 21: 831-843.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1467-2960en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4205
dc.description.abstractConcern over illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing has led to a number of policy, trade and surveillance measures. While much attention has been given to the impact of IUU regulation on industrial fleets, recognition of the distinct impacts on small-scale fisheries is conspicuously lacking from the policy and research debate. In this paper, we outline three ways in which the application of IUU discourse and regulation undermines small-scale fisheries. First, the mainstream construction of “illegal,” “unreported” and “unregulated” fishing, and also the categorical use of “IUU” in an all-inclusive sense, disregards the diversity, legitimacy and sustainability of small-scale fisheries practices and their governing systems. Second, we explore how the recent trade-related measures to counter IUU fishing mask and reinforce existing inequalities between different sectors and countries, creating an unfair burden on small-scale fisheries and countries who depend on them. Third, as IUU fishing is increasingly approached as “organized crime,” there is a risk of inappropriately targeting small-scale fisheries, at times violently. Reflecting on these three trends, we propose three strategies by which a more sensitive and ultimately more equitable incorporation of small-scale fisheries can be supported in the global fight against IUU fishing.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.subjectinclusive governanceen_US
dc.subjectcertificatioinen_US
dc.titleCollateral damage? Small-scale fisheries in the global fight against IUU fishingen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dcterms.bibliographicCitationSong, A. M. et al. (2020). Collateral damage? Small-scale fisheries in the global fight against IUU fishing. Fish and Fisheries, 21: 831-843.
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Officeen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.identifier.worldfish4628
cg.subject.agrovocgovernanceen_US
cg.subject.agrovocpoliciesen_US
cg.subject.agrovoctradeen_US
cg.subject.agrovocdeveloping countriesen_US
cg.subject.agrovocregulationsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsmall-scale fisheriesen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfishery managementen_US
cg.subject.agrovocseafoodsen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, Center for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Scienceen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studiesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, College of Science and Engineeringen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Amsterdamen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Technology Sydneyen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWageningen University & Research Centreen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationIndonesian Institute of Sciencesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCaribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanismen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheriesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/faf.12462en_US


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