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dc.creatorsmallhorn-west, P.en_US
dc.creatorSheehan, J.en_US
dc.creatorMalimali, S.en_US
dc.creatorHalafihi, T.en_US
dc.creatorBridge, T.C.en_US
dc.creatorPressey, R.L.en_US
dc.creatorJones, G.P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-28T07:50:14Z
dc.date.available2020-08-28T07:50:14Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationSmallhorn-West, P. F. et al. (2020). Incentivizing co-management for impact: mechanisms driving the successful national expansion of tonga’s special management area program. Conservation Letters, online first e12742.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1755-263Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4319
dc.description.abstractThe expansion of coastal marine protected areas can suffer from two key drawbacks: (a) the difficulty of incentivizing local communities to manage areas for conservation when their livelihoods also depend on resource use; and (b) that many protected areas get situated residually, or in locations with limited value for either biodiversity conservation or livelihoods. Here, we discuss and analyze key characteristics of Tonga’s Special Management Area (SMA) program, including both the mechanisms that have motivated its successful national expansion and its ability to configure no-take reserves in areas that are considered to have high value to resource users. Granting communities exclusive access zones in exchange for implementing no-take reserves has encouraged conservation actions while fostering long-term relationships with resources. Ensuring notake reserves occurred within the boundaries of exclusive access zones enabled communities to protect areas of greater extractive values than they would have otherwise.We conclude that the success of this program offers a way forward for achieving targets in the global expansion marine protected areas.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.sourceConservation Letters;13,(2020)en_US
dc.subjectscalingen_US
dc.subjectconservationen_US
dc.subjectlife below wateren_US
dc.titleIncentivizing co-management for impact: mechanisms driving the successful national expansion of tonga’s special management area programen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Organizationen_US
cg.coverage.countryTongaen_US
cg.coverage.regionPolynesiaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocco-managementen_US
cg.subject.agrovocnatural resources managementen_US
cg.subject.agrovocecosystemsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocdiffusionen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsmall-scale fisheriesen_US
cg.subject.agrovocmarine protected areasen_US
cg.subject.agrovocmarine ecologyen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, School of Environmental and Earth Sciences, Center for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Scienceen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studiesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, College of Science and Engineeringen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationMinistry of Agriculture, Food , Forestry & Fisheries Departmenten_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook Universityen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorsmallhorn-west, P.en_US
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheriesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/conl.12742en_US
cg.creator.idpatrick smallhorn-west: 0000-0001-6782-3704en_US


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