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dc.creatorAppiah, S.en_US
dc.creatorTO, A.en_US
dc.creatorTetty, A.en_US
dc.creatorAbbey, E.en_US
dc.creatorKuwornu, J.en_US
dc.creatorCole, S.M.en_US
dc.creatorChimatiro, S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T09:00:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T09:00:04Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.citationAppiah, S. Antwi-Asare, T. O. Agyire-Tettey, F. K. et al. Livelihood Vulnerabilities Among Women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana. Eur J Dev Res 33, 1596–1624 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41287-020-00307-7en_US
dc.identifier.issn0957-8811en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4404
dc.description.abstractWomen play essential role in the fisheries sector of Ghana, particularly their involvement in post-harvest activities. However, several factors make them vulnerable to livelihood insecurity. This paper investigates the livelihood vulnerabilities of women in small-scale fisheries in the Gomoa, West District of Ghana by constructing a multi-dimensional livelihood vulnerability index for women fish processorstraders and identifying the factors that make them vulnerable. The Alkire-Foster multi-dimensional measure was used to quantify livelihood vulnerability based on the capital assets identified in the Sustainable Livelihood Framework and alternative livelihood options explored. A beta regression model was used to further examine the effect of other socio-economic characteristics on their vulnerability. The results show that 70 per cent of the women surveyed were multi-dimensionally vulnerable to livelihood insecurity and were deprived in 80 percent of the indicators. The results of the beta regression revealed that differences in multi-dimensional vulnerability are explained by age, household size, household head, access to remittances, and post-harvest losses (fish spoilage). The paper provides valuable insights on how to build resilience of women in small-scale fisheries in Ghana. To sustain and enhance the livelihoods of women in the sector, policy interventions should focus on improving their access to livelihood resources, particularly social capital, as well as building human and institutional capacity.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageen, fren_US
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan (part of Springer Nature) (Hybrid journals [society-owned])en_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceEuropean Journal of Development Research;33,(2020) Pagination 1596,1624en_US
dc.subjectfish processors tradersen_US
dc.subjectmulti-dimensional vulnerabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectpost-harvest fisheriesen_US
dc.titleLivelihood vulnerabilities among women in small-scale fisheries in Ghanaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.coverage.countryGhanaen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Africaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocwest africaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsustainable livelihoodsen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Ghanaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationThe University of Energy and Natural Resourcesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationInternational Institute of Tropical Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationLilongwe University of Agriculture & Natural Resourcesen_US
cg.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorCole, S.M.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorChimatiro, S.en_US
cg.description.themeGenderen_US
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheriesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41287-020-00307-7en_US
cg.creator.idSteven Michael Cole: 0000-0002-8947-0871en_US


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