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dc.creatorLau, J.en_US
dc.creatorGurney, G.en_US
dc.creatorCinner, J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-06T08:56:13Z
dc.date.available2021-01-06T08:56:13Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.citationJacqueline D. Lau, Georgina G. Gurney, Joshua Cinner, Environmental justice in coastal systems: Perspectives from communities confronting change, Global Environmental Change, Volume 66, 2021, 102208, ISSN 0959-3780, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2020.102208.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0959-3780en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4436
dc.description.abstractLife in the Pacific is characterised by interconnected, fast and slow socio-ecological change. These changes inevitably involve navigating questions of justice, as they shift who benefits from, owns, and governs resources, and whose claims and rights are recognized. Thus, greater understanding of perceptions of environmental justice within communities will be crucial to support fair adaptation. We contend that an environmental justice approach offers a theoretical foundation to help illuminate key concerns and trade-offs as communities navigate global change. Here, we apply an empirical environmental justice lens to the use and customary management of coastal resources in Papua New Guinea. Through two case studies, we examine perceptions of distributional, procedural and recognitional justice. We find similarities and differences. There were common concerns about the injustice of unequal fishing pressure and destructive methods, but in one case, concerns about people’s material needs overrode concerns about non-compliance and unequal costs. In the other case, deliberative decision-making served as a platform for not only negotiating and re-defining the distribution of costs and benefits, but also airing grievances, thereby strengthening recognition of different people’s values and concerns. In addition, we find that recognitional aspects of justice, such as respect, can confer or undermine the legitimacy of procedures for governing resources and thus making fair decisions about distribution. The heterogeneity of justice criteria in our cases emphasizes the need to elicit and understand plural justice perceptions in different contexts.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-ND-4.0en_US
dc.sourceGlobal Environmental Change;66,(2020)en_US
dc.subjectcustomary managementen_US
dc.subjectlegitimacyen_US
dc.subjectsocio-ecological changeen_US
dc.subjectempirical equityen_US
dc.subjectFishen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental justice in coastal systems: Perspectives from communities confronting changeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.coverage.countryPapua New Guineaen_US
cg.coverage.regionMelanesiaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocpapua new guineaen_US
cg.subject.agrovoccoastal communitiesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studiesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Washington, College of the Environment, School of Marine and Environmental Affairsen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.description.themeMiscellaneous themesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2020.102208en_US
cg.creator.idJacqueline Lau: 0000-0002-0403-8423en_US


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