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dc.creatorLiverpool-Tasie, L.O.en_US
dc.creatorSanou, A.en_US
dc.creatorReardon, T.en_US
dc.creatorBelton, B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-08T08:18:13Z
dc.date.available2021-02-08T08:18:13Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationLiverpool-Tasie, L. S. O. Sanou, A. Reardon, T. Belton, B. (2021). Demand for Imported versus Domestic Fish in Nigeria. Journal of Agricultural Economics, online 6 Feb. https://doi.org/10.1111/1477-9552.12423en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-857Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4496
dc.description.abstractFish is among the most important animal-sourced foods in Africa and is crucial in combating malnutrition. Fish demand in Africa has far outpaced supply as the import share rose from 16% in 1970 to 39% by 2017. Little is known about who is consuming the imports: rural versus urban, rich versus poor. This is the first fish consumption analysis in Africa distinguishing imported and domestic fish, and within domestic fish, fresh versus traditional-processed. We analyse three rounds of nationally representative data from Nigeria, disaggregating the richer South from the poorer North, and urban and rural. Frozen (imported) fish accounted for 34% of urban fish consumption in the North (23% for rural), compared with 67% in urban areas in the South (54% for rural). The large difference in frozen fish consumption between regions is due mainly to differences in income and refrigerator ownership. For other fish forms (fresh, dried, smoked), regional differences are far less pronounced. Income and price elasticities confirm that imported fish have become deeply incorporated into fish consumption habits. From a policy perspective, this intensifies concerns about import bills as fish demand grows. However, our elasticity results show that Nigerian consumers are keen to consume fresh fish as incomes increase, and that demand for smoked and dried fish also remains strong at high levels of income. Promoting aquaculture is a promising policy path to reduce import dependence. Domestic capture fisheries remain a major source of fish, making it important to maintain productivity at sustainable levels through better management.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceJournal of Agricultural Economics;(2021)en_US
dc.subjectfood fishen_US
dc.subjectfish consumptionen_US
dc.subjectprocessed fishery productsen_US
dc.subjectdemand systemsen_US
dc.subjectfrozen productsen_US
dc.titleDemand for imported versus domestic fish in Nigeriaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderUnited States Agency for International Developmenten_US
cg.coverage.countryNigeriaen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Africaen_US
cg.subject.agrovoctradeen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsurveysen_US
cg.subject.agrovocdemanden_US
cg.subject.agrovoceconomic analysisen_US
cg.subject.agrovocimportsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocfishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationMichigan State Universityen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.description.themeMiscellaneous themesen_US


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