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dc.creatorMcMurtrie, J.en_US
dc.creatorAlathari, S.en_US
dc.creatorChaput, D.en_US
dc.creatorBass, D.en_US
dc.creatorGhambi, C.en_US
dc.creatorNagoli, J.en_US
dc.creatorDelamare-Deboutteville, J.en_US
dc.creatorChadag, V.en_US
dc.creatorCable, J.en_US
dc.creatorTemperton, B.en_US
dc.creatorTyler, C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-11T22:14:29Z
dc.date.available2022-09-11T22:14:29Z
dc.date.issued2022en_US
dc.identifier.citationMcMurtrie, J. Alathari, S. Chaput, D. L. Bass, D. Ghambi, C. Nagoli, J. Delamare-Deboutteville, J. Mohan, C. V. Cable, J. Temperton, B. & Tyler, C. R. (2022). Relationships between pond water and tilapia skin microbiomes in aquaculture ponds in Malawi. Aquaculture, 558, 738367. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2022.738367en_US
dc.identifier.issn0044-8486en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/5239
dc.description.abstractIntensification of fish farming practices is being driven by the demand for increased food production to support a rapidly growing global human population, particularly in lower-middle income countries. Intensification of production, however, increases the risk of disease outbreaks and thus the likelihood for crop losses. The microbial communities that colonise the skin mucosal surface of fish are poorly understood, but are important in maintaining fish health and resistance against disease. This skin microbial community is susceptible to disruption through stressors associated with transport, handling and the environment of intensive practices, and this risks the propagation of disease-causing pathogens. In this study, we characterised the microbial assemblages found on tilapia skin — the most widely farmed finfish globally — and in the surrounding water of seven earthen aquaculture ponds from two pond systems in distinct geographic regions in Malawi. Metabarcoding approaches were used to sequence the prokaryotic and microeukaryotic communities. We found 92% of prokaryotic amplicon sequence variants were common to both skin and water samples. Differentially enriched and core taxa, however, differed between the skin and water samples. In tilapia skin, Cetobacterium, Paucibacter, Pseudomonas and Comamonadaceae were enriched, whereas, the cyanobacteria Cyanobium, Microcystis and/or Synechocystis, and the diatom Cyclotella, were most prevalent in pond water. Ponds that clustered together according to their water prokaryotic communities also had similar microeukaryotic communities indicating strong environmental influences on prokaryotic and microeukaryotic community structures. While strong site-specific clustering was observed in pond water, the grouping of tilapia skin prokaryotes by pond site was less distinct, suggesting fish microbiota have a greater buffering capacity against environmental influences. The characterised diversity, structure and variance of microbial communities associated with tilapia culture in Malawi provide the baseline for studies on how future intensification practices may lead to microbial dysbiosis and disease onset.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en_US
dc.rightsOGL-UK-3.0en_US
dc.sourceAquaculture;558,(2022)en_US
dc.subjectponden_US
dc.subjectskin microbiomeen_US
dc.subjectbacterial communityen_US
dc.subjecteukaryotic communityen_US
dc.subjectFishen_US
dc.titleRelationships between pond water and tilapia skin microbiomes in aquaculture ponds in Malawien_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR Research Program on Fish Agri-Food Systemsen_US
cg.contributor.funderBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Councilen_US
cg.contributor.funderWellcome Trusten_US
cg.coverage.countryMalawien_US
cg.coverage.regionEastern Africaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocaquacultureen_US
cg.subject.agrovoctilapiaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationLilongwe University of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Bunda College of Agricultureen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationExeter Centre for the Study of the Life Sciencesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCardiff University, School of Biosciencesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Exeter, Collaborative Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture Futuresen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Exeteren_US
cg.contributor.affiliationCentre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Scienceen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationNatural History Museumen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationLilongwe University of Agriculture & Natural Resourcesen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorNagoli, J.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorDelamare-Deboutteville, J.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorChadag, V.en_US
cg.description.themeSustainable aquacultureen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2022.738367en_US
cg.identifier.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0044848622004835en_US
cg.creator.idJoseph Nagoli: 0000-0002-8919-1397en_US
cg.creator.idJerome Delamare-Deboutteville: 0000-0003-4169-2456en_US
cg.creator.idVishnumurthy Mohan Chadag: 0000-0002-2574-284Xen_US


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