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dc.creatorLau, J.en_US
dc.creatorSong, A.en_US
dc.creatorMorrison, T.en_US
dc.creatorFabinyi, M.en_US
dc.creatorBrown, K.en_US
dc.creatorBlythe, J.en_US
dc.creatorAllison, E.en_US
dc.creatorAdger, W.N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-08T22:02:49Z
dc.date.available2022-10-08T22:02:49Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.citationJacqueline D Lau, Andrew M Song, Tiffany Morrison, Michael Fabinyi, Katrina Brown, Jessica Blythe, Edward H Allison, William Neil Adger, Morals and climate decision-making: insights from social and behavioural sciences, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 52, 2021, Pages 27-35, ISSN 1877-3435, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2021.06.005.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1877-3435en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/5259
dc.description.abstractDecisions about climate change are inherently moral. They require making moral judgements about important values and the desired state of the present and future world. Hence there are potential benefits in explaining climate action by integrating well-established and emerging knowledge on the role of morality in decision-making. Insights from the social and behavioural sciences can help ground climate change decisions in empirical understandings of how moral values and worldviews manifest in people and societies. Here, we provide an overview of progress in research on morals in the behavioural and social sciences, with an emphasis on empirical research. We highlight the role morals play in motivating and framing climate decisions; outline work describing morals as relational, situated, and dynamic; and review how uneven power dynamics between people and groups with multiple moralities shape climate decision-making. Effective and fair climate decisions require practical understandings of how morality manifests to shape decisions and action. To this end, we aim to better connect insights from social and behavioural scholarship on morality with real-world climate change decision-making.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainability;52,(2021) Pagination 27,35en_US
dc.subjectclimate decision-makingen_US
dc.subjectsocial and behavioural sciencesen_US
dc.titleMorals and climate decision-making: insights from social and behavioural sciencesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderUniversity of Washington, Nippon Foundation Ocean Nexus Centeren_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.subject.agrovocclimate changeen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studiesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Technology Sydneyen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Exeteren_US
cg.contributor.affiliationBrock Universityen_US
cg.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorAllison, E.en_US
cg.description.themeClimate Changeen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2021.06.005en_US
cg.creator.idJacqueline Lau: 0000-0002-0403-8423en_US


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