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dc.creatorWilliams, M.J.
dc.creatorAgbayani, R.
dc.creatorBhujel, R.
dc.creatorBondad-Reantaso, M.G.
dc.creatorBrugère, C.
dc.creatorChoo, P.S.
dc.creatorDhont, J.
dc.creatorGalmiche-Tejeda, A.
dc.creatorGhulam, K.
dc.creatorKusakabe, K.
dc.creatorLittle, D.
dc.creatorNandeesha, M.C.
dc.creatorSorgeloos, P.
dc.creatorWeeratunge, N.
dc.creatorWilliams, S.
dc.creatorXu. P.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-27T09:18:57Z
dc.date.available2018-09-27T09:18:57Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifierWF_3153.pdf
dc.identifier.citationp. 785-874. In: Subasinghe, R.R.; Arthur, J.R.; Bartley, D.M.; De Silva, S.S.; Halwart, M.; Hishamunda, N.; Mohan, C.V.; Sorgeloos, P. (eds.) Farming the waters for people and food. Proceedings of the Globlal Conference on Aquaculture 2010. Phuket, Thailand. 22-25 September 2010. FAO, Rome and NACA, Bangkok
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/936
dc.description.abstractWomen are active participants in aquaculture supply chains, but a dearth of gender-disaggregated information hampers accurate understanding of their contribution. Research results and FAO National Aquaculture Sector Overview (NASO) fact sheets show that female participation rates vary by type and scale of enterprise and country. Women are frequently active in hatcheries and dominate fish processing plant labourers. Women’s work in small-scale aquaculture frequently is unrecognized, under or unpaid. Most aquaculture development projects are not gender sensitive, and aquaculture success stories often do not report gender dimensions; projects can fail if their designs do not include gender. Gender should be put firmly on the policy agenda and built into normative instruments, old and new, complemented by the collection of gender-disaggregated data for aquaculture supply chains. Women should be empowered through gender equity in access to financial, natural, training and market resources. Women in aquaculture should not be stereotyped as “small-scale” and poor. Women are often hampered by systemic barriers such as lack of legal rights. Women should be encouraged to build their management, leadership and entrepreneural skills. In circumstances where rural men have migrated for work, small-scale aquaculture has proven a suitable livelihood option to reduce the pressure on women. Because postharvest processing and fish trade are feminized occupations, gender equity deserves special attention in fair trade and fish certification schemes. HCD and gender are receiving more attention in rehabilitation efforts to assist survivors from disease and natural disasters.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.titleSustaining aquaculture by developing human capacity and enhancing opportunities for women
dc.typeConference Paper
dcterms.bibliographicCitationWilliams, M.J. et al. (2012). Sustaining aquaculture by developing human capacity and enhancing opportunities for women. p. 785-874. In: Subasinghe, R.R.; Arthur, J.R.; Bartley, D.M.; De Silva, S.S.; Halwart, M.; Hishamunda, N.; Mohan, C.V.; Sorgeloos, P. (eds.) Farming the waters for people and food. Proceedings of the Globlal Conference on Aquaculture 2010. Phuket, Thailand. 22-25 September 2010. FAO, Rome and NACA, Bangkok
cg.identifier.worldfish3153
cg.subject.agrovocaquaculture
cg.subject.agrovoccertification
cg.subject.agrovocgender
cg.subject.agrovochuman rights
cg.subject.worldfishequity
cg.subject.worldfishfish trade
cg.subject.worldfishpolicy
cg.subject.worldfishsmall-scale aquaculture
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorWeeratunge, N.
cg.description.themeGender


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