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dc.creatorSamina Afrin, K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-28T09:46:40Z
dc.date.available2020-04-28T09:46:40Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationKhandaker Samina Afrin. (12/1/2020). Suchana Semi-annual Survey 2019 Report.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4138
dc.description.abstractBangladesh has significantly improved its poverty and food security status over the years. Still there is scope to improve nutrition and livelihood status at the rural marginal level. With this goal, focusing on children, women and adolescent Suchana project has started working since 2016 and will continue till 2022. The project design considered 5 pillars as a) improved nutrition governance, b) improved access and utilization of nutrition specific and sensitive services, c) better nutrition through improved economic status, d) increased knowledge, skills and power of targeted households in particular women of reproductive age and e) robust evidence of impact generated for scale-up. The objective of the semi-annual survey is tracking the performance of phase-2 and phase-3 beneficiaries with a set of indicators for the senior management to take an informed decision. The key focus of these indicators is measuring the results under pillar 3 of Suchana and analyzing them to determine whether the program is on course to achieve its objectives. This study followed multi stage cluster sampling and collected 2400 samples for quantitative analysis in total. Among the total sample, 1200 samples were collected from phase 2 and rest 1200 samples were from phase 3. All the quantitative data were collected using CAPI device. The study also conducted 32 FGDs, 18 KIIs with private actors, NGO officials, government officials, output sellers etc., 78 KIIs with market actors and 10 case studies. The analysis found the percentage of beneficiaries that save in VSLA has increased significantly. Whereas around 20% beneficiaries were saving via VSLAs at the beginning of phase 2, now around 92% beneficiaries are saving via this channel. In case of satisfaction over inputs (regarding vegetables, fingerling, poultry, livestock.), around 87% beneficiaries were satisfied or moderately satisfied during the phase 2 (2018), whereas now around 92% beneficiaries are satisfied or moderately satisfied with the inputs. Around 84% of respondents were engaged in homestead gardening and on average the production per household in a season is 68 kg observed in phase 2. The majority of the beneficiaries (98.4%) used at least one improved production technology. Pit cropping technology was adopted by 55% respondents in the phase 2 (2018) and now around 75% respondents are using pit cropping technology in phase 2. However, the percentage of using floating beds and tower gardens is relatively lower. The project can focus on building awareness regarding these technologies. Uses of improved technology have increased significantly in case of aquaculture. The present study found that after one year of interventions, more than two-third (69%) of both IGA-aquaculture BHHs and HFP-aquaculture BHHs followed ‘carp-poly culture using improved aquaculture practices’ and those were 57.6% for IGA-ponds and 36.2% for HFP-ponds at the beginning. No respondents to use the traditional (natural) technology for fish farming whereas it was 29.4% for HFP-aquaculture and 2.6% for IGA-aquaculture. The average annual fish productions have increased in 86 Kg for IGA-aquaculture BHHs and 42 Kg for HFP-aquaculture BHHs at phase 2 working areas which were 38 Kg for IGAAquaculture and 26 Kg for HFP-aquaculture before the interventions. The average number of poultry in phase 2 is 11 per household whereas at the phase 2 (2018), it was 5 for HFP poultry and 9 for IGA poultry. The usage of improved technology in case of poultry rearing has also increased (66% in phase 2 (2018) and 73% now in phase 2 (2019)). More beneficiaries of phase 2 are now using hatching (Hazol) pot (46%) compared to that of phase 2 (2018) (22%). The effectiveness of awareness building regarding poultry rearing is conspicuous. The statement is true in case of vaccination as well. While 10% respondents used vaccination in phase 2 (2018), now around 43.6% respondents are using vaccination. The project facilitated the linkage between the vaccinator and beneficiaries that improved the vaccination practice of the respondents. This also reduced the mortality rate of the poultry from 38% in phase 2 (2018) to 29% at present in phase 2 (2019). The analysis found that, the number of beneficiaries involved in livestock rearing during last six months has been proliferated. During the phase 2 (2018) around 59% respondents were involved in livestock rearing out of 191 beneficiaries. The number significantly engendered at the present survey and now around 88% respondents are involved in livestock rearing. Moreover, beneficiaries are now more aware of symptoms of diseases of livestock (98.5%) compared to that of phase 2 (2018) (81%). The average sales volume has also increased at present compared to phase 2 (2018). During the phase 2 (2018), average sales for HFP aquaculture was 4 kg and IGA pond fish culture was 7 kg. However, now average sales for HFP aquaculture increased to 8.28 kg and IGA pond fish culture to 19.23 kg per year. Around 91.8% of cases, respondents purchased packaged seeds from the market. Although access to market has been increased over the year, around 57.9% respondents sold their produced goods in local market. Overall, 69.6% respondents are satisfied and 7.5% are very satisfied with the access to market among the respondents of phase 2. The average HFIAS score has decreased for phase 2 (2.67) compared to the phase 2 (2018) status (in 2018 survey, it was 4.97 phase 2). Therefore, we can conclude that the food security status of phase 2 respondents has been improved over time. The study found that above half of the total 1200 respondents of phase 2 (56%) are within food secured category while at the beginning 14% respondents were within this group. Clearly the food security status of the respondents of phase 2 has been ameliorated. Severely food insecurity status has decreased as well by 6%. While 17% respondents were under severely food insecure category at the beginning of phase 2, now 11% respondents fall under this category. The dietary diversity status of the respondents has improved compared to the phase 2 (2018). Whereas it was 30% (4 or more food group) now it is 43.8 percent. Regarding women's dietary diversity, 39 percent respondents are above the threshold of 5 or more groups that was 36 percent in the phase 2 (2018). Women’s access to market has increased over the time as 49% respondents reported that women took IGA decision during phase 2 (2018), now around 53% women are taking decision regarding IGA expenditure. Women participation regarding buying input has improved (Phase 2 of 2018 was 36% and Phase 2 of 2019 was 48%).en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherThe Nielsen Company (Bangladesh) Ltd.en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.subjectno povertyen_US
dc.subjectzero hungeren_US
dc.subjectlife below wateren_US
dc.titleSuchana Semi-annual Survey 2019 Reporten_US
dc.typeInternal Reporten_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderSave the Children Internationalen_US
cg.contributor.projectSuchana: Ending the Cycle of Undernutrition in Bangladeshen_US
cg.coverage.countryBangladeshen_US
cg.coverage.regionSouth Asiaen_US
cg.identifier.worldfish4647
cg.contributor.affiliationThe Nielsen Company (Bangladesh) Ltden_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.description.themeValue chains and nutritionen_US


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