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dc.creatorTigchelaar, M.en_US
dc.creatorCheung, W.W.en_US
dc.creatorMohammed, E.en_US
dc.creatorPhillips, M.J.en_US
dc.creatorPayne, H.J.en_US
dc.creatorSelig, E.R.en_US
dc.creatorWabnitz, C.C.en_US
dc.creatorOyinlola, M.A.en_US
dc.creatorFrölicher, T.en_US
dc.creatorGephart, J.en_US
dc.creatorGolden, C.D.en_US
dc.creatorAllison, E.en_US
dc.creatorBennett, A.en_US
dc.creatorCao, L.en_US
dc.creatorFanzo, J.en_US
dc.creatorHalpern, B.S.en_US
dc.creatorLam, V.W.en_US
dc.creatorMicheli, F.en_US
dc.creatorNaylor, R.L.en_US
dc.creatorSumaila, U.en_US
dc.creatorTagliabue, A.en_US
dc.creatorTroell, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-06T03:10:27Z
dc.date.available2021-12-06T03:10:27Z
dc.date.issued2021en_US
dc.identifier.citationTigchelaar, M. Cheung, W. W. L. Mohammed, E. Y. et al. Compound climate risks threaten aquatic food system benefits. Nat Food 2, 673–682 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00368-9en_US
dc.identifier.issn2662-1355en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/4978
dc.description.abstractAquatic foods from marine and freshwater systems are critical to the nutrition, health, livelihoods, economies and cultures of billions of people worldwide, but climate-related hazards may compromise their ability to provide these benefits. Here, we estimate national-level aquatic food system climate risk using an integrative food systems approach that connects climate hazards impacting marine and freshwater capture fisheries and aquaculture to their contributions to sustainable food system outcomes. We show that without mitigation, climate hazards pose high risks to nutritional, social, economic and environmental outcomes worldwide—especially for wild-capture fisheries in Africa, South and Southeast Asia, and Small Island Developing States. For countries projected to experience compound climate risks, reducing societal vulnerabilities can lower climate risk by margins similar to meeting Paris Agreement mitigation targets. System-level interventions addressing dimensions such as governance, gender equity and poverty are needed to enhance aquatic and terrestrial food system resilience and provide investments with large co-benefits towards meeting the Sustainable Development Goals.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherNATURE RESEARCHen_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; Non-commercial educational use onlyen_US
dc.sourceNature Food;2,(2021) Pagination 673,682en_US
dc.subjectenvironmental studiesen_US
dc.subjectclimate-change impactsen_US
dc.subjectFishen_US
dc.titleCompound climate risks threaten aquatic food system benefitsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.crpFISHen_US
cg.contributor.funderOAK Foundationen_US
cg.contributor.funderWalton Family Foundationen_US
cg.contributor.funderMAVA Foundationen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationBlue Food Assessmenten_US
cg.contributor.affiliationStanford University, Center for Ocean Solutionsen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationThe University of British Columbiaen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFishen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of British Columbia, Institute for the Oceans and Fisheriesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Bernen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUnversity of Bern, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Researchen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationAmerican Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationHarvard T. H. Chan School of Public Healthen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationMichigan State Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationShanghai Jiao Tong Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJohns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethicsen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationJohn Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studiesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of California-Santa Barbara, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesisen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of California, Bren School of Environmental Science and Managementen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationStandford University, Hopkins Marine Stationen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationStanford Universityen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of British Columbia, School of Public Policy and Global Affairsen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Liverpool - School of Environmental Sciencesen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationStockholm Resilience Centreen_US
cg.contributor.affiliationBeijer Institute of Ecological Economicsen_US
cg.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexeden_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorMohammed, E.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorPhillips, M.J.en_US
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorAllison, E.en_US
cg.description.themeClimate Changeen_US
cg.description.themeSustainable aquacultureen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s43016-021-00368-9en_US
cg.creator.idMichael John Phillips: 0000-0002-0282-0286en_US


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