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dc.creatorBrummett, R.E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-10T11:13:29Z
dc.date.available2019-01-10T11:13:29Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifierhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004484860100850X
dc.identifier.citationAquaculture 214(1/4): 103-114
dc.identifier.issn0044-8486
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/2308
dc.description.abstractThree typical African partial harvesting systems and an unfished control were compared for gross yield. Fish grew undisturbed on an input regime based on that used by Malawian smallholding farmers for 122 days. Then, for an additional 143 days, ponds were partially harvested once per week by hook and line, seining with a reed fence or basket trapping. Hook and line fishing and seining with a reed fence partially harvested a significantly (P0.05) greater weight of fish than did trapping. Gross yield was significantly (P0.05) higher in ponds partially harvested by hook and line. Partial removal of juveniles had the largest impact on increased yield.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceAquaculture
dc.titleComparison of African tilapia partial harvesting systems
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrummett, R.E. (2002). Comparison of African tilapia partial harvesting systems. Aquaculture 214(1/4): 103-114
dc.description.versionPeer Review
cg.coverage.countryMalawi
cg.coverage.regionAfrica
cg.identifier.worldfish2967
cg.subject.agrovocfishing methods
cg.subject.agrovocfish ponds
cg.subject.agrovoctilapia
cg.subject.worldfishfish harvesting
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFish
cg.identifier.statusLimited access
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexed
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0044-8486(01)00850-X
cg.identifier.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004484860100850X


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