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dc.creatorBrummett, R.E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-25T02:54:52Z
dc.date.available2019-02-25T02:54:52Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifierna_1456.pdf
dc.identifier.citationNAGA 18 (4): 8-10
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/2800
dc.description.abstractWhat direction should SubSaharan African agriculture take — industrialized or smallholder agriculture? The author says that a compromise, using the best elements of each, would be best, but in order to develop a strategy, the target groups need to be understood. Here the IVIalasilan situation is given as an example: the degree of food "insecurity"; the fact that little smallholder produce is sold; and ways of improving productivity and production. The benefits of integrating aquaculture into farms is seen to make good sense biologically. If socioeconomic constraints can be overcome, widespread adoption of integration would provide at least medium-term relief, while larger-scale mechanisms are developed.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEn
dc.publisherICLARM
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.sourceNAGA
dc.titleThe context of smallholding integrated aquaculture in Malawi: a case study of SubSaharan Africa
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBrummett, R.E. (1995). The context of smallholding integrated aquaculture in Malawi: a case study of SubSaharan Africa. NAGA 18 (4): 8-10
cg.coverage.countryMalawi
cg.coverage.regionAfrica
cg.identifier.worldfish1456
cg.subject.agrovocdevelopment
cg.subject.worldfishsmall-scale aquaculture
cg.contributor.affiliationICLARM
cg.identifier.statusOpen access
cg.description.themeSustainable aquaculture


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