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dc.creatorBarclay, K.
dc.creatorVoyer, M.
dc.creatorMazur, N.
dc.creatorPayne, A.M.
dc.creatorMauli, S.
dc.creatorKinch, J.
dc.creatorFabinyi, M.
dc.creatorSmith, G.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-02T09:28:43Z
dc.date.available2018-08-02T09:28:43Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier4065_2017_Barclay_Importance.pdf
dc.identifier.citationFisheries Research, 186(Part 2): 426-438
dc.identifier.issn0165-7836
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12348/363
dc.description.abstractOver recent decades it has become widely accepted that managing fisheries resources means managing human behaviour, and so understanding social and economic dynamics is just as important as understanding species biology and ecology. Until recently, fisheries managers and researchers have struggled to develop effective methods and data for social and economic analysis that can integrate with the predominantly biological approaches to fisheries management. The field is now growing fast, however, and globally, researchers are developing and testing new methods. This paper uses three divergent case studies to demonstrate the value of using qualitative social science approaches to complement more conventional quantitative methods to improve the knowledge base for fisheries management.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceFisheries Research
dc.titleThe importance of qualitative social research for effective fisheries management
dc.typeJournal Article
dcterms.bibliographicCitationBarclay, K. et al. (2017). The importance of qualitative social research for effective fisheries management. Fisheries Research, 186(Part 2): 426-438
dc.description.versionPeer Review
cg.contributor.crpFISH
cg.coverage.countryAustralia
cg.coverage.countryPapua New Guinea
cg.coverage.countrySolomon Islands
cg.coverage.regionOceania
cg.identifier.worldfish4065
cg.subject.agrovocfisheries
cg.subject.agrovocresearch
cg.subject.agrovocresource management
cg.subject.cabifishery management
cg.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Techonogy Sydney
cg.contributor.affiliationENVis Environm Consulting
cg.contributor.affiliationNational Fisheries College
cg.contributor.affiliationJames Cook University
cg.contributor.affiliationWorldFish
cg.contributor.affiliationAustralian National University
cg.identifier.statusLimited access
cg.identifier.ISIindexedISI indexed
cg.contribution.worldfishauthorFabinyi, M.
cg.description.themeResilient small-scale fisheries
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2016.08.007en_US
cg.identifier.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2016.08.007


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